Animals

19 Amaze-wing Facts About The Wompoo Fruit Dove For Kids

Read these wompoo fruit dove facts about the amazing bird that is mostly found in tropical and subtropical rainforests.
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A wompoo fruit dove (Ptilinopus magnificus) is mostly green in color, with green underparts and a conspicuous yellow wing bar. It also has a striking paler gray large size head, green underparts, and yellow lower belly. They are known for having purple plumage around their neck and some other parts, but the juveniles seem to have duller and greener plumage than an adult fruit dove. Both sexes are similar when it comes to the physical description of these birds. Wompoo fruit doves are also considered to be the most beautiful doves found in Australia.

They can mainly be found in tropical and subtropical rainforests living under the thick canopy of the rainforest trees. They could be located in the thick rainforest of regions of New Guinea and certain regions of New South Wales running up to central-eastern Queensland and northeastern Queensland. A wompoo fruit bird would build its nest on a fruit-bearing tree so that it could easily locate its food. The sounds of falling fruits could help find this species of birds. The presence of a wompoo bird could be marked by a 'wompoo' sound which sounds like a loud, monotonous woo note.

This species of wompoo fruit doves are seen feeding on fruit-bearing trees and vines. Their favorite fruit is considered to be figs. Their basic food comprises a variety of rainforests fruits. These birds are hard to see when they are busy feeding fruits from the trees high up in the canopy area.

These birds are considered to be monogamous. Breeding season usually takes place from the middle of the dry season to the early wet season. However, the breeding season is also known to vary according to weather conditions. These birds form up pairs and start building a nest. One white egg is laid every season. Incubation and care of the chick are done by both parents. Just one single chick is raised by these birds. Both the sexes take part in the construction of their twig nest.

Here on our page, we have lots of interesting facts on the wompoo fruit dove that everyone will enjoy. So let's have a look at these interesting facts; and if you do like these, then read our articles on the hooded oriole and the golden oriole.

Wompoo Fruit Dove

Fact File

What do they prey on?

Figs, insects, and fruits of trees and vines

What do they eat?

Herbivores

Average litter size?

1

How much do they weigh?

8.5-17.5 oz (241-496 g)

How long are they?

14-18 in (35-45 cm)

How tall are they?

N/A

What do they look like?

Green and canary yellow

Skin Type

Feathers

What are their main threats?

Humans, habitat loss, and overhunting

What is their conservation status?

Least Concern

Where you'll find them

Tropical and subtropical rainforests

Locations

New Guinea and eastern Australia

Kingdom

Animalia

Class

Aves

Scientific Name

Ptilinopus magnificus

Family

Columbidae

Genus

Ptilinopus

Wompoo Fruit Dove Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a wompoo fruit dove?

A wompoo fruit dove (Ptilinopus magnificus) is a species of mostly green birds with a paler gray head.

What class of animal does a wompoo fruit dove belong to?

The class of animal that a wompoo fruit dove (P. magnificus) belongs to is Aves. This species of wompoo fruit dove is identified by its large head and a conspicuous rich purple throat, chest, and upper belly, and yellow lower belly.

How many wompoo fruit doves are there in the world?

The population size of these doves is unknown, but keeping in mind the fact that they are free from threats of becoming extinct, we can say that they are widespread and commonly occurring birds in Australia.

Where does a wompoo fruit dove live?

The basic habitat of a wompoo fruit dove is the tropical rainforests of Australia and New Guinea.

What is a wompoo fruit dove habitat?

A wompoo fruit bird is found in the tropical and subtropical rainforests. They are hard to see breeding in any other location than a rainforest. They are found breeding in the thick canopy of these rainforest trees. Also, they do not travel long distances but make their nest near the fruit-bearing trees where they could easily locate food.

Who do wompoo fruit doves live with?

A wompoo bird is seen living with a species of its kind. It does not live in solitude.

How long does a wompoo fruit dove live?

The lifespan of a wompoo fruit dove is of five years.

How do they reproduce?

The breeding season of this bird lasts from the middle of the dry season to the early wet season. First, one white egg is laid by the females. Then both the sexes take turns in the incubation and care of the chick. The incubation period for these doves lasts about 21 days. Once the hatching is done, the chick gets ready to fledge in about 13-14 days.

What is their conservation status?

According to the IUCN, the conservation status of a wompoo fruit dove is declared as Least Concern. This means that they are free from the threat of becoming Endangered or even Extinct.

Wompoo Fruit Dove Fun Facts

What do wompoo fruit dove look like?

A wompoo fruit dove is identified by its large paler gray head, a conspicuous throat chest and upper belly, and a yellow lower belly. In addition, they are known for having a purple plumage around their neck, throat, and belly. Both sexes are similar. Speaking of the juveniles, they seem to have duller and greener plumage than an adult fruit dove.

A wompoo fruit dove is native to Australia and New Guinea and is considered the most beautiful dove found in Australia.

How cute are they?

A wompoo bird is considered to be the most beautiful dove found in Australia. While keeping this point in mind, we can say that these fruit-eating birds are considered to be very cute by the majority of the population. However, whether they are cute or not is subjective.

How do they communicate?

A wompoo fruit dove communicates by making a distinctive wompoo sound that sounds like a loud, monotonous 'woo' note.

How big is a wompoo fruit dove?

A wompoo fruit dove (Ptilinopus magnificus) is around 14-18 in (35-45 cm) long in size, and this species of bird are considered to be four to five times bigger than mice. Both sexes of these birds are similar in size.

How fast can a wompoo fruit dove fly?

It isn't easy to give an approximated speed of the wompoo fruit doves, but they can fly at an average speed like the other similar species of birds.

How much does a wompoo fruit dove weigh?

A wompoo fruit dove weighs around 8.5-17.5 oz (241-496 g).

What are the male and female names of the species?

They are referred to as male wompoo fruit-dove and female wompoo fruit dove, respectively.

What would you call a baby wompoo fruit dove?

A baby wompoo dove is called a juvenile. Juveniles are known to have much duller and greener plumage than the adult sexes of this species of birds. These birds are difficult to see when they are feeding on fruits.

What do they eat?

Wompoo dove birds are seen feeding on fruit-bearing trees and vines high up in the canopy area. Figs are considered to be their most favorite food.

Are they dangerous?

No, this wompoo fruit bird is not at all dangerous. It is harmless.

Would they make a good pet?

If provided with favorable conditions, these birds could make good pets. They have a calm and curious personality.

Did you know...

This fruit-eating bird is also known for its large size head and yellow lower belly.

These birds are best located by sounds like falling fruits.

The breeding season of this bird is dependent on the changing weather conditions.

Like the wompoo fruit dove, a Jambu fruit dove is a herbivore; it also feeds upon fruits.

A wompoo fruit dove would build its nest on a fruit-bearing tree. They are usually found in the thick rainforest of Australia, New Guinea, and certain areas of New South Wales running up to central-eastern Queensland and northeastern Queensland.

This bird has a conspicuous yellow wing bar and a rich purple throat, chest, and upper belly, which are mostly green and canary yellow in color.

Why are fruit doves Endangered?

Habitat loss and overhunting are the basic factors that affect their population. Because of these very reasons, we can witness a decline in the population of these birds in the regions of Australia. In addition, Mariana fruit doves are Endangered because tree snakes were artificially introduced into their habitat, and they pose a threat to these birds.

Are wompoo fruit dove and wompoo fruit pigeon the same?

Yes, a wompoo fruit dove is also sometimes known as a wompoo fruit pigeon. They both refer to the same bird that is mostly green in appearance and considerably small and have a bright coloring around the neck and head.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! For more relatable content, check out these common ground dove facts and ringneck dove facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable wompoo fruit dove coloring pages.

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