Animals

15 Amaze-wing Facts About The Green Mango For Kids

Amusing green mango facts which you won't believe.
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The green mango bird is a large hummingbird species. They are endemic to the mainland of Puerto Rico and the green mango habitat can be found generally in mountainous areas of the main island. A green mango hummingbird defends its feeding trees against other hummingbirds. The adults have emerald green top parts and their rounded tail is metallic blue. The underlaying parts are metallic blue-green. The green mango bill is black, and curved downwards. The eyes to see are dark brown. Male and females are similar, except the female have a small white spot which is not present in males. Chicks or youngs of these birds acquire tinged brownish heads and back.

This hummingbird forages at all levels from the understory to the treetops. They feed on nectar from various plants, shrubs, flowers, insects, flies, and spiders. Insects are caught on the wing, while spiders are taken from leaves. The nectar is taken from the corolla or by piercing the flower at the base of the corolla. The male Puerto Rican mango is known for defending its feeding area as it defends one tree against other hummingbirds. They do not migrate, but they may perform altitudinal movements according to the flowering season. Like all Trochilidae species, they are also able to hover in all directions with eight-shaped rapid wingbeats. It is a common resident in the C and W mountains of Puerto Rico and for now, this species is not threatened.

For more relatable content, check out these palm warbler facts and Carolina parakeet facts for kids.

Green Mango

Fact File

What do they prey on?

Nectar, beetles, flies, spiders, and insects

What do they eat?

Omnivores

Average litter size?

2 eggs

How much do they weigh?

0.23-0.25 oz (6.6-7.2 g)

How long are they?

4.3-5.5 in (11-14 cm)

How tall are they?

N/A

What do they look like?

Green, blue, and olive

Skin Type

Feathers

What are their main threats?

Habitat loss and climate change

What is their conservation status?

Least Concern

Where you'll find them

Mountains, foothills, woodlands, grasslands, and tropical forests

Locations

Puerto Rico

Kingdom

Animalia

Class

Aves

Scientific Name

Anthracothorax viridis

Family

Trochilidae

Genus

Anthracothorax

Green Mango Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a green mango?

A green mango is a type of hummingbird. Adults have emerald green top parts and their rounded tail is metallic blue. The underlaying parts are metallic blue-green and its bill is black, and curved downwards. The eyes are dark brown. Male and females are similar except the females have a small post-ocular white spot which is not present in males.

What class of animal does a green mango belong to?

These birds are endemic to Puerto Rico and inhabit the mountainous areas of the main island. They defend feeding trees against other hummingbirds. Adults have emerald green top parts and their rounded tail is metallic blue. The underlaying parts are metallic blue-green.

How many green mangoes are there in the world?

The total number of these birds present across the world is unknown.

Where does a green mango live?

This bird lives in mountainous regions of the main island. They can be found residing in forests and edges, coffee plantations, mountains, and foothills. It is rare to spot a green mango in coastal areas. They live in a cup-shaped nest built with woven fibers of plants.

What is a green mango's habitat?

The Green-breasted mango bird habitat can be found in areas of mountainous regions, islands, grasslands, woodlands, and tropical forests. The Green mango range is across the island of Puerto Rico. This species is most common between 2,624.7-3,937 ft (800-1,200 m) elevation.

Who do green mangoes live with?

They live in a nest alone or sometimes as a flock in a pack.

How long does a green mango live?

The green mango lifespan is around three to four years.

How do they reproduce?

The breeding season of these birds occurs mainly between October to May. The male performs aerial displays to impress or attract females with a U-shaped flight in front of females. Females build a cup-shaped nest with woven fibers of plants which is a compact cup with an outer part decorated with lichen for better camouflage. The nest is attached to a vertical branch in a tall tree, usually about 26.2 ft (8 m) high above the ground. The female lays up to two white eggs per season and incubates them alone. When hatching, the chicks are black in color. The male remains in nearby trees or surrounding to guard and see, while the female incubates.

What is their conservation status?

The conservation status of this bird is of Least Concern.

Green Mango Fun Facts

What do green mangoes look like?

Adults have emerald green to olive-green top parts and their rounded tail is metallic blue. The underlaying parts are metallic blue-green. This bird's bill is black and curved downwards. The eyes to see are dark brown. Male and females are similar except the female has a small post-ocular white spot which is not present in male. They have long and pointed beaks which indicate their belongingness to the hummingbird species.

Green mango hummingbirds have a coloration of olive green with a dark combination.

How cute are they?

These birds are adorable and cute to see with their cute behavior and friendly nature.

How do they communicate?

They communicate through calls with infrequent trill like twitter.

How big is a green mango?

They are around 4.3-5.5 in (11-14 cm), which is two times larger than a dark fronted babbler.

How fast can a green mango fly?

They are swift and fly fast. They do not migrate and they may perform altitudinal movements according to the flowering season to see and look out for nectar.

How much does a green mango weigh?

They weigh around 0.23-0.25 oz (6.6-7.2 g).

What are the male and female names of the species?

There are no specific names used to describe male and female birds.

What would you call a baby green mango?

Youngs of these birds are simply known as chicks or hatchlings.

What do they eat?

The green mango diet includes feeding on nectar from various plants, shrubs, flowers, insects, flies, and spiders. Insects are caught on the wing, while spiders are taken from leaves. They are known to regurgitate the indigestible parts of their prey as pellets. The nectar is taken from the corolla or by piercing the flower at the base of the corolla.

Are they dangerous?

They are not dangerous birds and can be domesticated as pets.

Would they make a good pet?

Like parrots, they will make an extremely good pet as they are adorable to watch and are friendly in nature.

Did you know...

The hummingbird species got their name from the humming noise that they produce.

This bird species has no sense of smell.

Is the green mango endemic?

Yes, it is endemic or native to Puerto Rico and since it does not migrate, it is by and large found in the mountains of Puerto Rico.  They perform altitudinal movements according to the flowering season to see and search for nectar.

How did the bird green mango get its name?

This bird got its name thanks to the color it carries on its neck and underlay which one can see and spot easily. The neck and the head area are emerald green, while the rounded tail is metallic blue. The underlaying parts are metallic blue-green.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other birds from our amethyst-throated hummingbird facts and military macaw facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable hummingbird coloring pages.

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