Animals

Gloster Canary: 15 Facts You Won’t Believe!

Gloster canary facts (Gloster fancy canary) about the birds that are often bred in a cage.
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The Gloster canary (scientific name: Serinus canaria domesticus) is also known as the Gloster fancy canary. It is a small songbird originating from Gloucestershire, England. This species is not found in the wild but rather as a product of selective breeding from different canaries in the 1920s. The canaries were named after the Canary Islands, in which it was originally found.

There are two classifications of the Gloster canary - the consorts and the coronas. The consorts have smooth heads, while the coronas have crested heads. These songbirds have been very popular among pet breeders because of their body structure, cheerful behavior, and beautiful singing talents. These species do not exhibit sexual dimorphism and you can barely differentiate the sexes from their appearance. Although, male birds have better singing talents, and females are found to have bigger tummies. Being a product of various breeds, the Gloster canary can appear to be very colorful ranging from yellow to cinnamon and brown hues.

Taking care of the Gloster canary at home is quite easy and simply being low-maintenance has caught the interest of many bird enthusiasts across the globe. With a proper diet, good care, and comfortable living conditions, you can keep this species happy and healthy even for up to 12 years.

If you like reading this article about Gloster canary (Gloster fancy canary), you also might want to check out facts about pin-tailed whydah and Southern royal albatross.


Gloster Canary

Fact File

What do they prey on?

Insects, canary seeds

What do they eat?

Omnivore

Average litter size?

3-6

How much do they weigh?

0.02-0.03 lb (12-29 g)

How long are they?

4.5 in (11.5 cm)

How tall are they?

3-3.5 in (8-9 cm)

What do they look like?

Green, yellow, and cinnamon

Skin Type

Feathers

What are their main threats?

Humans

What is their conservation status?

Least Concern

Where you'll find them

Open scrublands and cage

Locations

England

Kingdom

Animalia

Class

Elasmobranchii

Scientific Name

Serinus canaria domesticus

Family

Fringillidae

Genus

Serinus

Gloster Canary Interesting Facts

What type of animal is a Gloster canary?

The Gloster canary is a small short lively bird that is often seen as a pet in various regions of the world.

What class of animal does a Gloster canary belong to?

The Gloster canary is one of the many species in the genus Serinus, which is a group of small birds that are mostly found in Europe and Africa.

How many Gloster canaries are there in the world?

Although there is no particular data as to how many Gloster canaries exist, records show that there are roughly 150,000-160,000 pairs of canaries in the Canary Islands.

Where does a Gloster canary live?

The Gloster canaries are popular pet birds and are often housed in cages. In the wild, canaries live in open scrublands and grasses.

What is a Gloster canary's habitat?

Similar to any other canary, Gloster canaries should be kept in an elevated cage with wide-open spaces. They require vertical bars and at least one perch for sleeping. Multiple installations would also allow them to play from perch to perch.

Who do Gloster canaries live with?

Glosters can live with other canaries in the same cage, depending on their size. Although a single bird wouldn't survive alone, it is not recommended to keep two males in a single enclosure because they can be territorial, especially when it is time to breed. These species can live with humans and would barely require physical interaction. But, they can be very sweet and might need a lot of affection.

How long does a Gloster canary live?

The average lifespan of the Gloster canary is 10-15 years.

How do they reproduce?

Like any other canary, Gloster canaries are typically easy to breed. The Gloster canary breeding season takes place around December to April and the female could have a clutch size of three to six eggs, laying one egg on a nest every day. Breeding pairs are best kept in cages with quality food, good lighting, and secured conditions. While two consorts can produce good smooth-headed off-springs, it is important to know that two Gloster corona canaries should not be bred together. This is because the dominant gene that causes the crested head can be lethal if doubled, or if coming from both parents. Such incompatibility may result in poor crests, bald heads, or even dead broods. For quality breeding, it is best to pair a crested canary (consort) with a smooth-headed canary (corona).

What is their conservation status?

The Gloster canary is currently listed as Least Concern by the IUCN. Its population is found to be stable with no major threats of extinction.

Gloster Canary Fun Facts

What do Gloster canaries look like?

The canaries, Gloster canaries included, are generally a small breed of birds. The two kinds of Gloster canaries are classified based on their head structure. The corona Gloster canary has a distinct bowl-cut crest, while the consort Gloster canary has a flat and smooth head. As a result of the breeding of various canaries, the Gloster canary comes in almost all canary colors except for Red-Factor Canary hues. The Gloster canary may exhibit a mix of yellow, brown, white, frost, cinnamon, gray, and green. Gloster canaries are not sexually dimorphic but female birds were found to have bigger and rounder abdomen.

There are two classifications of the Gloster canary: Coronas with crest head sand Consorts with flat heads.

How cute are they?

Gloster canaries are really cute, especially for those who are interested in breeding birds. The Gloster canary singing abilities are also very entertaining!

How do they communicate?

The Gloster canary is known for its beautiful singing abilities. Like other songbirds, they communicate through screaming, chirping, beeping, squawking, and whistling. However, it is notable that only the mature male Gloster canary can really sing. The females, on the other hand, only make short calls and sweet sounds.

How big is a Gloster canary?

The average weight of the Gloster canary is 4.75 in (11.5 cm). That's almost the size of a Chinese Hamster!

How fast can a Gloster canary fly?

There is not much information on the flight of the Gloster canary but, the canaries are known to be very lively and active species. With their high metabolic rate, they are able to fly for about half an hour continuously. Experienced pet owners can train Glosters to fly freely in an enclosed room and to go back in their cage thereafter.

How much does a Gloster canary weigh?

The Gloster canary bird weighs about 0.03-0.06 lb (12-29 g) or just as heavy as a regular frog!

What are the male and female names of the species?

Male birds are generally referred to as cocks, while females are called hens.

What would you call a baby Gloster canary?

Like any other bird species, the baby Gloster canary is called a chick.

What do they eat?

The diet of the Gloster canary birds mostly consists of leafy vegetables, fruits, and seeds such as canary and rape. Citrus fruits should be avoided for they can cause diarrhea. You may also offer them commercial pellets to supplement their diet with vitamins and minerals. In the wild, canaries would also prey on insects.

Are they dangerous?

The canaries are generally not harmful to humans. Although they are lively birds, the Gloster canaries are not really keen to be held as much as other bird species like parrots. The canaries rarely bite but it is best to just watch them play and listen to them in the performance of a song.

Would they make a good pet?

The Gloster canary is a low-maintenance bird and can actually make a good pet. They do not demand so much attention and physical interaction from their owners. Although these pet birds can be territorial if housed with other canaries, the Gloster canary would not survive in a cage alone. It is best to keep a pair of a male and female birds, especially if you are interested in breeding them.

Did you know...

The Gloster canaries like baths. If trained well, you can bathe your pet bird almost every day.

Aside from being a low-maintenance bird, Gloster canaries are charming, sweet, and docile. They can be perfect pets for all ages including children and seniors.

Gloster canaries are not keen on toys and tricks, but you can keep playing canary songs to young males to train them to sing.

Good lighting triggers the Gloster canaries to sing. In fact, they might refuse to sing if placed in a  cage that is poorly lit.

Gloster canaries, especially the males, do not only use their singing to attract a potential mate but also to mark their territories and to reciprocate the affection of their owners.

Why does the Gloster canary have a bowl cut?

The bowl cut of the Crested Gloster canary, also called the 'beatle haircut', is brought by a dominant allele that causes its head feathers to shape like a crest wig. This species is a product of cross-breeding Herz, Border, and Crested canaries. The Gloster canary was first put life by Mrs. Rogerson, a breeder in Gloustershire, United Kingdom.

What are canaries known for?

The canaries are part of the family of finches that are especially known to be cute, cheerful, and sociable. These characteristics have made them popular pets all over the world. They make great companions and very well suitable in a cage within a home environment. More than being a low-maintenance breed, their beautiful and harmonious singing is a trait that has caught the heart of millions of bird enthusiasts across the globe. They are lively, but not as loud as other bird species which can be annoying at some point.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly animal facts for everyone to discover! Learn more about some other birds from our Florida grasshopper sparrow facts and common grackle facts pages.

You can even occupy yourself at home by coloring in one of our free printable songbird coloring pages.

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